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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 189 (some duplicates have been removed)
believed them. today's report says that much never happen again. >> learning about science may become a thing of the past for school children in indonesia. the government wants to cancel science class is to make more room for religion and nationalism. teachers say it is a move backwards. >> learning about the newton laws of motion by launching a rocket. it is a fun exercise for children around the world. indonesian children might soon miss out on such experiments. if the government goes ahead with its plan to take science out of the curriculum. >> science is cool, lots of useful objects can be made through science. with science, we can create unique objects. when i grow up, i want to be a professor in biotechnology. professor in biotechnology.
important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard-nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter scho
christy is wrong, i do not have to tell him that, because the science tells him that. >> there was a poll, saying that parents think in video games contributes to a culture of violence. 89% of parents polled, point the finger of violence to tv and movies. what do you say to the parents every day, everything americans that are saying that as a parent, they look at it and feel that way that these violent video games add something to the culture of youth they are raising? >> well, first of all, i support the rights of any parent to not buy any product that they do not want to buy for their children. and that is why the video game industry has spent a long time cataloging and creating ratings systems and labeling descriptions on every game that is sold in the stores so they know what is it in so they do not have to buy it for their children. the science points to something different that the science shows that and this is confirmed by the surgeon general and by the supreme court that video games are not posing danger for adults or children. >> when we look at 2008, the stats, game makers have
is low. daphne koller, a computer science professor at stanford, is one of coursera's founders. >> i think by opening up education for free to everyone around the world, they're going to turn education, high-quality education, from a privilege to a basic human right, so that anyone, no matter their social, economic or family circumstances, has access to the best education. >> reporter: those lofty goals-- the experience of teaching thousands of students and the possibility of future profits-- are what got these courses going. professors from top universities are signing up, even though they are not paid by the providers. eventually, universities may share revenues they receive-- when there are revenues-- with the professors. and those star professors have inspired intense student interest in the courses, says coursera's other co-founder, andrew ng. >> most people today will never have access to a princeton, stanford, cal tech class. but now, if you wake up tomorrow morning and you decide you want to take a cal tech class, you can. you can just sign up for one, and it's free. >> repor
than it appears, it's not rocket science? >> and not only maybe not rocket science but ends up being good. in texas, 6% unemployment and that is attributed to the energy boom. they allowed it to happen. on the federal level we are not allowing it to take place. in iowa they have a surplus and the fours they have an unemployment rate. so you can make people's lives better. it makes sense to people in a common sense level but in the federal area not so much. >> neil: i get a lot of e-mail. we had ron johnson on and got heated on and where is your backbone in spending cuts. you have folks saying, you have to realize elections have consequences. the president won. this to say beyond justifying tax hikes, it justified no spending cuts. i don't think that is the americanss saw it. they won't see the math here that hurts democrats and republicans alike if something isn't done? >> here is the question i think the president knows well that this is the question. is california the model we're going to follow? they are $165 billion to $335 billion in debt. they say they might have a surplus beca
-producing town west of bakersfield. the 16-year-old gunman walked into his science class and began firing with a 12 gauge shotgun. he didn't say a word. he fired at a second student but missed before the teacher was able to talk him down. >> we were all together in the room. everyone was helping each other. everybody was afraid that everyone was there for each other. >> police say the two victims were target the because the shooter says he had been pulleyed by them. >>> new this morning a car wash fundraiser is planned for 9:00 in san jose to help a family who loft three members in an apartment fire. the december 29th fire killed go family members. the proceeds raised to the will help pay for the funeral costs. >>> a series of violent attacks on women in san francisco is prompting new warnings about using your cell phone in public. it's a growing problem. last year half of all robberies involved stealing an electronic device. we have the story. >>> this woman walking along polk street was texting and not looking up. it's in attention like this that san francisco police says makes people v
think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. i have not seen a program with that bill 10. people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rather than just jobs today an
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
, celeste ward gventer thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: as unemployment, growth and budget concerns continue, the man who will lead president obama's new economic team was formally nominated today. the announcement came this afternoon, the latest in a series of major cabinet changes. >> one reason jack has been so effective in this town is because he is a low-key guy who prefers to surround himself with policy experts rather than t.v. cameras. >> brown: with that, the president introduced his nominee to be the next secretary of the treasury, jack lew, the man he made his chief of staff, a year ago yesterday. lew would succeed tim geithner, who drew fulsome praise from the president. >> when the history books are written tim geithner's going to go down as one o
with a shotgun in a science classroom, wounding one student and leaving three others with minor injuries. another school shooting doesn't change the difficult politics of this issue. though biden's meeting came with a photo op. >> as an owner of shotguns, as a guy, i'm no great hunter, mostly skeet shooting for me. >> both the nra meeting and an evening meeting with the entertainment representatives pictured here were closed. during his movie, "django unchained" quentin tarantino with movies like "pulp fiction" refused to answer the question about the possibility of violent images. >> the vice president is talking to the people in the movie industry today about violence. >> and you know where i stand on it. >> which is that there is no relationship. >> yes. >> but you haven't said why you think there is no relationship. >> it's none of your damn business what i think about that. >> there you go. an arraignment hearing for james holmes, the shooter who killed 12 people and injured dozens more at a movie theatre in aurora, collapsed summer and claimed to be inspired by "batman's" joker is scheduled
exploitation, spreading its roots in science and technology around the world. and he had enemies here. his enemies with the southern segregation. the anti-imperialists, and the conservatives who said american fascists are those people who think wall street -- so he had enemies and those enemies want to get rid of him on the ticket in 1944. the big problem was he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in chicago, potential voters who they want to run on vice president dick 65% said they wanted wallace on the ticket or 2% said they wanted harry truman. the question was how was the party bosses going to support. roosevelt was very feeble. when party bosses are to come to them and they want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says to him, i support wallace but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough again. i am depending on you guys to do it. finally, caved in. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with them. every one of the rows of kids was furious with them. they were huge wallace supporters. he had all the black dele
fill with mud and a very sophisticated science you can reconstruct environmental histories going back in time. this is the 1920s and 1800's and look at past pollution levels preserved in the archive like a history book in the bottom of a lake. >> say that pollution levels right now are low, but you think they're going to go up over time but it strikes me even in the example you were just talking about and in saying they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many c
. there was an outcry provoked by this horrific crime. in a new delhi suburb, science of how slow change may be. the authorities and their attitudes -- signs of how slow change may be. another woman was found dead after a suspected gang rape. she was going home from her job at a factory. when her father reported her missing, police did not listen. >> they were rude and said she had probably gone off with a man. do not worry, she will come back. >> another family grieving now. many ask if things will really change it when the ander dies down -- anger dies down. >> there is a heavy police presence in belfast after violent protests involving children as young as 10. the disturbance was sparked by the decision to limit the number of days the union flag flies over city hall. dozens of police officers have been injured. our correspondent has sent us the latest. >> the main route through east belfast looks like a battleground. pilots for the fifth consecutive night. -- riots for the fifth consecutive night. the protest target five weeks ago. there is no end in sight. political leaders are well aware o
line that is -- has filled, science fiction novels. there's more to the script. there are 17 billion planets similar to earth in our galaxy. could the similarities mean that any of those could support life? a short time ago i discussed that with theoretical physicist michio kaku. >> this is a game changer. one out of six stars that you see a night could have an earth- like planet going around it. somebody could be looking back at us from our space. >> what are the chances that they are? some of these planets circulating might have the possibility of supporting life? >> to be fair, most of the earth-size planets probably have no more than microbial life like germs and seaweed. a few of them might have intelligent life. dna has been around for about $3.50 -- 3.5 billion years. only in the last five runners thousand years as intelligent life risen out of this one. you cannot rule out intelligent life. quex in 2011, astronomers said they had found two earth sized planets. now it is billions. >> they have taken a census of the milky way galaxy. 50% of all stars have some kind of planet go
and it is a science fiction work in which amphibian's take over the world. they are too clever for the human. they will show that they can also be clever about their elected officials. >> former on the presidential race in the czech republic, we are joined by our eastern europe correspondent to just came back from the czech republic. thank you for joining us. this is the first time people can directly elect the president. is this changing things? >> the new president will have more to say because he will be directly elected by the people. maybe he can be something like a moderator in this very different political scene. we have not seen much in the government that were able to and a regular term in office. there are social democrats on the one side and then the conservatives on the other. it is a very difficult, political scene. >> there is a wide field of candidates. >> the former prime minister who form the social democratic party in the 1990's is leading the opinion polls. he is quite a character, charming, humorous. he is very different than the other potential favorite, also a former pr
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. >>> welcome. you made headlines recently talking about gun control. what is your view when you see these military-tile weapons in the hands of civilians? >> i made a career of carry be weapons. they fire a 556 round at about 3,000 feet per second and when it hits human flesh, it's devastating. it's designed to be that way. that's what i want soldiers to carry. but i don't want those weapons around our schools, i don't want them on our streets. if we can't -- it's not a complete fix to just address assault weapons but if we don't get very serious now when we seeing children being buried, then i can't think of a time when we should. >> you don't buy the argument that the only good answer to a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun? >> i don't. and i think it's a time we have a serious discussion and not an eit
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. >>> since republicans flopped in the election, they've been getting all kinds of advice about how to fix the party. today, peggy noonan wrote an article called it's pirate time for the gop. pirate time. she says now the time to put a dagger between their teeth, wave a sword, grab a rope and swing to the enemy's gallliean. the they never belonged to him. they're yours. well, shiver me timbers. peggy noonan has gone pirate. she's looking to taxes, immigration, guns. in other words, become more like president obama. ahoi, there, maties. that's a swash buckling idea. but, unfortunately, the gop is goin
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> since republicans flopped in the election, they have been given all manner of advice about how to fix the party. and today, peggy noonan, the conservative columnist for "the wall street journal" wrote it is pirate time for the gop. pirate time. she says now is the time to put a dagger between their teeth, wave a sword, and swing to the enemy. the president's issue, take them, steal them, they're never wrong, they're never yours. well, peggy noonan has gone pirate and wants the gop to go pirate, on issues like taxes, immigration, guns. in other words, become more like president obama. ahoy there, maties, that is a swash buckling idea. but unfortunately, the gop is going the other way. they are likely to cut funds, demand offsets. these black-hearted rogues include congressman rogers, tom mcclintock. give them all an eye patch. that is just awful. and the party is not getting better on women's issues either. today, a republican lawmaker had t
. senator rockefeller was first elected in 1984 and he is on the commerce, science, and transportation committees. >> thank you, sharon. so incredibly much. a perfect life, by far the most popular rockefeller and west virginia. -- wife, by far, the most popular rockefeller in west virginia. i will get right to them. i have decided not to run again at the conclusion of this term. not now, but in 2014. i hope each of you can understand that this is an entirely personal decision. it is not a political decision and it is not easy. as i approached 50 years of nonstop public service, precluding time with the children and sharon. i consider the ways for travel in life. there are many other ways, and i know deep within me that in 2014, it is the right time for me to recalibrate and find a new balance. i came as an untrained social worker back in 1964. i actually begun my public service for years before that, working for the peace corps and the department of state. frankly, i was in search of a clear and powerful purpose. i wanted something that was so compelling and obsessive that it would fil
. [applause] >> thank you very much, everyone, for coming. thank you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm
austrian finance minister of climate change science. financeok our former scienc minister around the world read only for started, he said humans were not responsible and was w opposed to any action on climate change. we traveled for four weeks. i took into the u.s., the u.k. by the end, i got him to a point where he said, "climate change is happening and humans have probably cost part of it." i was able to convince him somewhat of the need to switch to renewable energy. we need to make these transitions right away toward wind and solar, clean energy, because if we don't, we are going to see more and more of these devastating extreme weather events that occurred not just australia, the people all around the world. >> anna rose, how sycophant is the position of the u.s. on climate change >> -- how significant is the position of u.s. on climate change? >> it is extremely significant countries like the street and around the world. the rest of the world has started to act around the world. the europe has been doing it for those big stepsad will not happen until we get the united states to put a
between science and science fiction. >> you can probably imagine there would be some people like that. >> absolutely. >> and then the whole idea of growing a clone to be able to replace your face. >> the possibilities are endless, barbara, you're right. but this is a major step. i think we'll be hearing more about total face transplants in the future. >> and kudos to the university of maryland for taking it to the next level. >> thank you for coming in and taking this to the next level. we've been following this and we'll continue. >> have a good weekend. >>> it's 11:41. >>> a bendable phone? and a preview of this weekend's golden globe awards and a look at who i think will take home an so... [ gasps ] these are sandra's "homemade" yummy, scrumptious bars. hmm? i just wanted you to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. [ male announcer ] fiber one. [ man ] excuse me miss. [ gasps ] this fiber one 90 calorie brownie has all the deliciousness you desire. the brownie of your dreams is now deliciously real. >>> a warning for anyo
's not rocket science. oversight investigation is not rocket science. i used to teach at american university and i used to teach a lot of courses to cops and prosecutors. this isn't rocket science, and i don't know of age if age should be rocket science. i am very impressed with some people i talk to at a.i.d. has said we really need to design programs knowing where we are working. if we know we are working in the most corrupt country in the world we designed a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. now i haven't seen a program without built-in but people tell me they are thinking about it. somebody told me that her regions do that. yes, circ? >> previously i ran a team for operations under dod to afghanistan. one of the things that i came away with is that afghanistan, afghans are good at running their own businesses. but what we do is we create an incentive whereby running business is about short-term profit. so what we have didn't, is partner with afghan, several afghans over there and we are trying to build electricity infrastructure were afghans actually have
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. cheryl: what do you get when you mix judaism and beer brewing? well, according to the next guest, you get an american-jewish celebration beer. small business, big ideas, this is the best. founder of scmaltz brewers, called hebrew. what inspired you? >> well, hebrew beer is the first and only jewish celebration beer in the united states, high end craft beer marketed to the jewish community and anybody else who loves great beer. cheryl: all my jewish friends are wine drinkers, is there the population? >> yes, we get the question all the time. i thought jews didn't drink beer. that was going to be the bumper sticker in the beginning. we play with stereotypes, and it's important to have a wonderful high end craft beer to celebrate jewish tradition, the calendar, but, also, now craft beer is popular and growing we want to make beers to stand with the best craft beers. cheryl: sales impressive, 125,000 cases sold, $3.5 million in sales. that's not small, th
came to science class in the middle of first period, aimed a shotgun at a fellow student and pulled the trigger. he didn't stop there. >> he didn't try to engage a second student that he named and tried to shoot him and missed. the teacher at that point was trying to get the students out of the classroom and engaged the shooter who had numerous rounds of shotgun shells in a 12 gauge shotgun. numerous rounds in his pocket. he engaged the suspect with in conversation. a campus supervisor showed up, was outside the classroom and together they engaged in conversation with this young man and at one point he put the shotgun down and police officers were able to take him into custody. >> shepard: that, they say, may have saved the day. still, two targets, one hit and one missed. the sheriff says the gunman had as many as 20 rounds in his pockets when they arrested him. now we are getting some clues as to why he may have done. this the sheriff says the suspect and the victim had some sort of dialogue this morning. but he could not confirm reports the suspect had been bullied or that he was
. >> we'll take a quick look. >> reporter: to what looked like a scene from a science fiction movie. >> believe it or not, these timbers washed in from the ocean or bay. >> this timber right here. >> absolutely. >> are this washed in -- >> all this debris you see washed in from the tidal surge. >> reporter: this station, the end of the line for the city's number one subway train, is called south ferry. three years ago it was brand new. built at a cost of more than half a billion dollars. now it's in ruins. sandy broke records for the biggest waves in new york harbor, for the biggest surge in new york city, and for the lowest pressure ever north of north carolina. what was the impactful part of sandy was the surge at 12, 15 feet. that surge had never been seen in new york city before. >> when we were here the water was just below this level. >> reporter: nearly a month after our first interview. >> you can see the rust. >> reporter: this time dressed in a suit and tie, he took us back underground. >> it wasn't a rebuilding as some of our other stations. that was a brand new tunnel st
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus on reporting from the front lines. the only known person that has been held in connection with the attack on the american consulate in libya has been released by a judge in tunisia. the news agency in tunisia reports he was questioned as a witness, not a suspect, but an american federal law enforcement official tells susan candiotti the freed man remains a suspect. the official says investigators have identified 15 other individuals that he believes will eventually be indicted. cnn contributor tom fuentes says bringing any suspects to justice will be very difficult because of the chaos in the aftermath of the attack. he says the fbi also lacks a strong investigative partner in libya. >>> for the second day in a row the same airline, the same boston airport, is having a problem with boeing's dream liner. this is japan airlines. there was a flight carrying 181 people. it was
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 189 (some duplicates have been removed)